Industry News

Wireless Charging for Larger Devices

  • PDF

Freescale launches a 15W Qi-compliant wireless charging solution-- one the company claims is suitable for the cable-free charging of larger devices, such as tablets and handheld medical devices.

Wireless charging tabletCurrent wireless charging solutions handle just 5W, meaning the Freescale system would also enable faster charging for smartphones, as well as tablets armed with a 4000mAh battery.

The Freescale solution comes in the shape of two 15W ICs-- the WPR1516 receiver and the MWCT1012 transmitter chips. It supports several industry standards, including the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) and the Power Matters Alliance (PMA), and is complemented with "flexible enablement technologies" such as a pair of evaluation board options for different output power topologies.

Read more...

Ingram Micro Buys ANOVO

  • PDF

Ingram Micro buys into device lifecycle services with ANOVO, a Paris-based provider of reverse logistics and repair services for devices such as smartphones and STBs across Europe and Latin America.

Ingram MicroThe financial details of the deal are not available, but Ingram Micro says it will further expand the company's relationship with many of the largest telcos and OEMs around. It should be finalized by early 2015 following approval by EU competition authorities.

"Our intent to acquire ANOVO is well aligned with our strategic growth initiatives to expand our services offerings globally and will greatly broaden our capabilities in the European and Latin American markets, two regions that are experiencing robust growth with the proliferation of mobile devices, accessories and wearables," Ingram Micro states. "ANOVO's core service offerings, infrastructure, client relationships and high-caliber management team will further strengthen Ingram Micro's global technology lifecycle services capabilities and we believe this addition will be an excellent complement to our ongoing operations."

Read more...

Gorilla Glass 4 Promises Tougher Devices

  • PDF

Corning claims Gorilla Glass 4 is up to twice as tough as any competing hardened glass display covers, being designed to handle the top mobile device customer concern-- screen breakage from everyday drops.

Gorilla Glass 4“With Gorilla Glass 4, we have focused on significantly improving protection against sharp contact damage, which is the primary reason that mobile devices break," the company says. "Dropping and breaking a phone is a common problem, and one that our customers have asked us to help address.”

According to Corning Gorilla Glass 4 survives 80% of face-down falls on rough surfaces, and retains most of its strength following a shatter-free fall, thanks to manufacture via proprietary "fusion draw" process. In comparison non-hardened soda-lime glass (the kind used in bottles and windows) breaks nearly 100% of the time in similar tests.

Read more...

ARM Boosts IoT Processors

  • PDF

ARM reveals the Cortex-M7, a 32-bit addition to the Cortex-M processor family promising to deliver double the compute and digital signal processing (DSP) capability of current ARM-based microcontrollers.

Cortex-M7Designed for use in high-end embedded applications such as next-generation vehicles, connected devices and smart buildings, the M7 runs at 400MHz (in comparison the previous M4 runs at 168MHz), allowing for faster audio and image processing, as well as demanding embedded applications.

"The addition of the Cortex-M7 processor to the Cortex-M series allows ARM and its partners to offer the most scalable and software-compatible solutions possible for the connected world," ARM says. "The versatility and new memory features of the Cortex-M7 enable more powerful, smarter and reliable microcontrollers that can be used across a multitude of embedded applications."

Read more...

CD-Making Alloy Key for Future Displays?

  • PDF

One of the alloys found in CDs and DVDs might be key for the thin and flexible displays of the future-- University of Oxford researcher discovered one can "draw" images on a thin layer of GST alloy sandwiched between two transparent electrode layers.

Flexi displayGST (aka Ge2Sb2Te5 or Germanium-Antimony-Tellurium) alloy is a phase change material (PCM), meaning it is able to change between two states with the application of heat, light or electricity. It finds use in rewritable CDs and DVDs, where laser pulses cause it to switch between amorphous and crystalline states.

"We didn't set out to invent a new kind of display," research leader Professor Harish Bhaskaran says. 'We were exploring the relationship between the electrical and optical properties of phase change materials and then had the idea of creating this GST "sandwich" made up of layers just a few nanometres thick. We found that not only were we able to create images in the stack but, to our surprise, thinner layers of GST actually gave us better contrast. We also discovered that altering the size of the bottom electrode layer enabled us to change the colour of the image."

According to the researchers tiny PCM stacks can be turned into "nano-pixels" measuring just 300 x 300 nanometers. One can electrically switch these on and off at will to create the building blocks of a high-resolution display technology.

Read more...